Conservation Genetics

Conservation Genetics

In 1998, the Molecular Genetics Department of Omaha's Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium began a biodiversity survey. The department decided to focus on the island of Madagascar, one of the world's greatest biodiversity hotspots, with endangered plants and animals that exist nowhere else on earth. This project, now called the Madagascar Biodiversity Partnership (MBP), began with the collection of samples and distribution data from the island's rare flora and fauna. The intent of these collections was to find differences in species distribution and conduct surveys used to identify key habitats with unique diversity. This habitat and animal research helps wildlife agencies and organizations maximize the impact of their conservation efforts, without research endangered populations cannot be managed or protected.  Omaha's Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium's MBP research has led to the discovery of 21 new lemur species!

However, science alone cannot be the only component to conservation of the island’s biodiversity. The MBP has expanded their efforts to include community-based conservation, education and outreach.

About Madagascar

Madagascar is considered one of the most diverse and ecologically important biodiversity hotspots in the world. These areas consist of unique plants and animals whose very existence are under threat. Sadly, the agricultural practice of tavy (slash and burn farming), mining, illegal logging and poaching have resulted in the loss of more than 90% of Madagascar's original forest and an overwhelming majority of animals are now on the lists of endangered and critically endangered species. For the critically endangered species that reside within these forests to survive, the local communities must take ownership and activity engage in conservation.

Dr. Edward Louis Jr., director of the Conservation Genetics Department at Omaha's Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium, has been working in Madagascar since 1998. Since his first trip to the island nation 15 years ago, Dr. Louis and his team have visited more than 160 sites and studied more than 5,000 lemurs. The focus of the program has been to develop baseline molecular genetic and distribution data on Malagasy flora and fauna with an emphasis on lemur species.

Since the onset of Omaha's Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium's involvement in Madagascar, this conservation research effort has produced more than 100 scientific publications, including manuscripts describing 21 new species of lemur and elevating eight other lemurs to species level.

Much of the fieldwork is now done in collaboration with the Madagascar Biodiversity Partnership (MBP), a non-governmental Malagasy organization that Dr. Louis started in 2010. The Madagascar Biodiversity Partnership evolved out of Omaha's Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium's conservation programs. Together, the Zoo and the Madagascar Biodiversity Partnership strives to protect local forests for the lemurs while sustainably raising the standard of living for thousands of people who are equally reliant upon the natural resources.

Believing that everything is connected, or "Mampifandray ny tontolo," the Zoo and the Madagascar Biodiversity Partnership incorporates research, education and community involvement to achieve sustainability. This multifaceted program was recognized for its efforts with the 2010 Association of Zoos and Aquariums' International Conservation Award.

Other Facts About Madagascar:

  • About the size of Texas, Madagascar is the fourth largest island in the world.
  • Madagascar is located near the southeastern coast of Africa
  • The native culture of Madagascar is Malagasy; the native language is also Malagasy.
  • Over 80 percent of Madagascar’s animals are endemic, meaning they can’t be found anywhere else in the world.
  • Over 90 percent of Madagascar’s forests have disappeared due to human activity.
  • Madagascar is home to the most endangered primate in the world, the Greater Bamboo lemur. This lemur got its name from its diet that is made up of 90% bamboo, despite the toxic levels of cyanide it contains.

Programs and Projects

During the 2013 revision of the Species Survival Commission of the International Union for Conservation (IUCN), a new lemur strategic conservation plan was developed. Lemurs are the most threatened group of mammals, and the strategic plan will provide guidance to preserve this biodiversity.

Primate experts, including Dr. Louis, determined that 90% of all lemur biodiversity now exists within 30 priority sites in Madagascar. These sites were selected due to the presence of critically endangered species and significant threats to remaining habitats. Four of these sites are key locations for Omaha's Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium's Madagascar Biodiversity Partnership. At these locations, intensive emergency surveys have been ongoing to develop baseline levels of threat and remaining biodiversity.

Realizing that sustained preservation is only possible with local participation, Omaha's Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium's Madagascar Biodiversity Partnership has designed its conservation efforts to be community-based. The following highlight some of the work being done at the Zoo's Madagascar Biodiversity Partnership's priority sites:

Analamazaotra
Kianjavato
Antsiranana
Lavavolo

Analamazaotra

Reintroduction and Translocation Project

The Analamazaotra Special Reserve is an evergreen rainforest, which is a short, three-hour drive from Madagascar's capital city of Antananarivo. This reserve remains one of the most popular tourist destinations in Madagascar due to the guaranteed opportunity to view quite closely the Indiri, the largest remaining lemur.

Historically, the reserve was part of a continuous forest that included Mantadia National Park to the north, Maromizaha Classified Forest to the southeast and Anosibe an'ala to the south. However, due to habitat destruction, the four forests are now relatively isolated yet remain home to vast biodiversity, including many endemic rare and endangered species.

The endangered Diademed sifaka and the critically endangered black and white ruffed lemur were once among the fauna found in Analamazaotra Special Reserve. In 1973, hunting pressures led to the regional extinction of the Diademed sifaka. Three years later, the black and white ruffed lemur followed. Although forest management regimes have improved protection efforts of the forests, not all of the voices of the forest have returned.

Dr. Louis and his field team were recruited by Madagascar National Parks and Eaux et Fôret (Malagasy Forestry Service) to initiate the first-ever attempt to recover a species' former distribution in Madagascar. In January 2006, after more than four years of planning and adherence to the International Union of Conservation of Nature (IUCN) guidelines, Omaha's Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium initiated the Analamazaotra Reintroduction and Translocation Project by re-establishing the Diademed sifaka and black and white ruffed lemur back into their historical habitat range within Analamazaotra Special Reserve.

The collaborative multi-disciplinary project has evaluated the biomedical, genetic, habitat, nutritional and reproductive parameters through the daily monitoring of 34 radio-collared translocated/reintroduced lemurs, including 26 Diademed sifaka and eight black and white ruffed lemurs from nearby forests. These translocated lemurs created new groups and have produced numerous offspring in the following years.

The project has succeeded by re-established the wild lemur populations, collecting data, preserving fecal samples for hormone analysis, increasing protection within the reserve and habituating the re-introduced groups to human presence. These introduced lemurs, taken from threatened populations or small, unsustainable forest tracts, are doing so well that visitors have been lucky enough to see three generations of babies born at the park. This project has also helped the Malagasy community through the training of Malagasy doctorate and graduate students and local field guides and educating the local communities about the biodiversity of their local eco-region.

Kianjavato

Largest Multifacted Conservation Effort

In the last five years, Kianjavato has quickly become Omaha's Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium's most significant and comprehensive conservation effort. The program incorporates multiple lemur monitoring intiatives, a regional community-based reforestation effort, as well as the introduction of alternative technologies that reduce the pressures on the natural habitat while improving the quality of life for participating residents. The program is based out of the Kianjavato Ahmanson Field Station, which serves as a community center, teaching hub and site for the introduction of new technologies and procedures.

Aye-Aye Research Project

Although well-known for centuries, the aye-aye's reclusive lifestyle has limited our understanding and knowledge of its ecology, demography and population genetics in natural populations. This nocturnal lemur with unusual traits, including an elongated, thin, highly flexible middle finger leads a solitary life.

Aye-Ayes have the largest species range of any existing lemur. Omaha's Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium's Madagascar Biodiversity Partnership is active at two sites that represent aye-aye habitats across the eastern geographic range of the species, the humid primary forests of Kianjavato and Torotorofotsy.

Due to the demand of the forests they call home, aye-ayes may especially be vulnerable to extinction due to deforestation.

Four local guides, hired and trained by the Madagascar Biodiversity Partnership, follow the elusive primates through the forest and collect data regarding demography, habitat use and food resources. Our monitoring program has been utilizing radio collars to monitor these elusive lemurs since 2010. Radio collars allow for the collection of GPS data, which allows for the estimation of home range sizes. We currently follow three adult males and one female, named Bozy, who gave birth to her second baby in June 2013.

Greater Bamboo Lemur Monitoring

The greater bamboo lemur (Prolemur simus) in the humid forests of eastern Madagascar is critically endangered. In fact, it ranks among the top 25 most endangered primates in the world and, at one point, was even thought to be extinct. Its rediscovery in 1986 in Ranomafana was one of the leading factors in designating the area as a national park. It was simultaneously rediscovered in the Kianjavato coffee plantation, an area that currently harbors the greatest concentration of the species. Once widely distributed across vast areas of the country, massive deforestation and hunting have resulted in dwindling numbers of greater bamboo lemurs. An estimated 300 individuals now remain. However, a successful program implemented by Omaha's Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium's Madagascar Biodiversity Partnership in the villages of the Kianjavato Commune is helping to reduce hunting and is rallying local support for the lemur's conservation.

A team of international volunteers and local field guides track individuals of this endemic and endangered lemur species daily, collecting a variety of data. The program is conducting a comprehensive study on the population genetics of the greater bamboo lemur, which is keystone information in developing effective in-situ conservation plans. For this project, non-invasive techniques are used, relying on fecal samples instead of tissue as the source of DNA. This means less stress on the lemurs, less expense and the ability to make a research team of Malagasy residents and provide modest amounts of training.

Varecia Monitoring

Black and white ruffed lemur populations are found in the forest fragments surrounding the commune of Kianjavato. This lemur species is listed among the 25 most endangered primates in the world due to habitat loss and hunting. This monitoring program instilled by Omaha's Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium's Madagascar Biodiversity Partnership involves a team of international volunteers and local field guides to track individuals of this endemic and endangered lemur species daily to record diet, home range and social interaction observations. This monitoring will aid in determining the populations' genetic health and habitat management.

As with the greater bamboo lemur study, the Varecia study is comprehensive, looking at the population genetics of the black and white ruffed lemur, a vital component for developing effective in-situ conservation plans. For this project, non-invasive techniques are used, relying on fecal samples instead of tissue as the source of DNA. The collection of fecal samples from this important seed-dispersing species is particularly vital to our reforestation program.

Education Promoting Reforestation Project

The Education Promoting Reforestation Program (EPRP) focused on the unique diet of the critically endangered black and white ruffed lemur, which consumes up to 90% fruit, eating it whole and then passing the seeds unharmed.

Omaha's Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium's Madagascar Biodiversity Partnership discovered that seeds collected from this species' fecal samples grow better than "unprocessed" seeds. In this unique reforestation project, seeds are used from the lemur's feces to rebuild lemur-friendly forests, not only planting the lemurs' favorite seeds, but also timber and fruiting trees closer to the villages to provide additional food and income.

Under the EPRP, Madagascar Biodiversity Partnership personnel, volunteers and graduate students track the lemurs through the forest, collecting fecal samples and plant the seeds in nurseries. The seedlings are transplanted as part of a community-supported reforestation program in an effort to restore Kianjavato's damaged forests. Some tree species serve to restore habitat and enable movement of future lemur populations while other species have a commercial value and benefit residents as an additional source of income. As we have seem throughout the program, community awareness and support has increased due to the regular participation of many local community members to monitor lemurs, maintenance and preparation of seedlings in the local nurseries, as well as the transplantation of trees.

The EPRP had modest beginnings focused on seven-kilometer stretch in which 60,000 trees were planted. However, with the help of local participants, we have planted more than 100,000 trees in the region in the past two years, making the future brighter and hopefully greener for these communities and the lemurs. Ultimately, we'd like to plant one million trees back into the Kianjavato landscape. We believe that our innovative forest corridor program can be one facet in a larger, overarching vision to reduce poverty while promoting a sustainable future for the residents of Kianjavato.

Conservation Credit Program

In 2012, Omaha's Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium's Madagascar Biodiversity Partnership initiated a conservation credit program to encourage participation at community plant events, which rewards families or individuals with a variety of items for planting trees. Incentive items were selected for the potential of improving the standard of living while reducing people's burden on local forests. These items included fuel-efficient rocket stoves, biofuel briquettes, commercially valuable trees, Water Hippo rollers and Tough Stuff solar panels and accessories. The distribution of incentive items as part of the conservation credit program is strengthening community ties to forest and habitat preservation.

In collaboration with graduate students from the University of Nebraska at Omaha's Geography Department, the Madagascar Biodiversity Partnership aims to streamline and automate the conservation credit program. Participants will soon receive electronic identification cards to track their involvement and reward earnings. This technology will provide us with other valuable data collection like number and species of trees planted and the location for each planting.

Automation of the conservation credit program is an essential advance in the Madagascar Biodiversity Partnership's one million tree effort and its related conservation credit program. Once deployed, this system can function as a model for serving the needs of Madagascar's people and wildlife. Encouraging communities to sustain themselves by conserving their resources through the use of alternative technologies will be a long-term process, but is the most effective way of steering Madagascar onto a healthier, more prosperous course.

Antsiranana

Northern Sportive Lemur Project

The world's most endangered primates are not gorillas or orangutans, but the relatively unknown northern sportive lemur (Lepilemur septentrionalis). Only about 50 remaining individuals are known to exist and are restricted to the rapidly deminishing forests of the Montagne de Français Reserve in Madagascar.

As the northern sportive lemur does not survive in captivity, preservation of its natural habitat is the only way to ensure this species' survival. Yet, rapid extinction of the northern sportive lemur is a very real possibility due to habitat loss associated with the extensive production of charcoal throughout its restricted range. The loss of this species, which is currently on the list of the 25 most endangered primates, could be followed by other species endemic to Montagne de Français, such as 36 endangered or critically endangered plants only found there.

Here, Omaha's Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium's Madagascar Biodiversity Partnership's conservation program is working to save this most endangered lemur by fervently working with the local community to protect this habitat, introducing alternative fuel sources and establishing a reforestation program.

Rocket Stove Project

Charcoal production is resulting in large swaths of trees being cut for fuel with little to no opposition from government or park officials. The land is then left exposed in a hot and dry environment risking desertification. Eventually, local villages will not be able to supply themselves with supplies elsewhere. Residents of nearby Andavakoera participate in this illegal activity as they previously had not been introduced to affordable alternatives.

Omaha's Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium's Madagascar Biodiversity Partnership and Conservation Fusion, an international non-governmental organization focused on conservation education, have been working with Andavakoera since 2009. Overall, the community has been receptive to new ideas and eager for change that will improve the standard of distributing 100 fuel-efficient cooking stoves coupled with an intensive education program to participants in the forestation program in Antsiranana. The income-generating potential of these technologies increase the likelihood of long-term acceptance. Simultaneously, a reforestation program incorporating native trees and a sustainable agriculture component will restore ecosystem services.

The momentum generated from this initiative will be used to encourage local people to assume leadership roles in the sustainable development of their home and protect the northern sportive lemur and forests of Montagne de Français.

Aquaponics Pilot Program

Recent research indicates that small-scale fisheries in Madagascar have a significant and positive impact on local economies due to their contribution to food security and poverty reduction, both critical factors in development of sustainable societies. This is a sustainable food production method that combines aquaculture techniques of raising fish for food with hydroponics methods of growing plants in a liquid medium. When the system is properly balanced, both the vegetation and fish can be regularly harvested, providing much needed food security to the community.

Omaha's Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium's Conservation Genetics Department has initiated a pilot project focused on aquaponics. We are partnering with Whispering Roots, an Omaha-based non-profit that specializes in aquaponics to design a system using locally available materials that are robust enough to withstand the climate and incorporate local vegetation and dish preferences to ensure acceptance by the community.

As of September 2013, we have constructed and are currently testing a pilot program in which we will mirror the concepts that we hope to build in Madagascar. This test system is allowing us to learn the process hands-on as well as evaluate vegetation and fish productivity in the system for deployment in Madagascar. We hope to transfer this knowledge to our field team in Madagascar in 2014.

Lavavolo

Radiated Tortoise Project

The spiny forests near the village of Lavavolo in southwestern Madagascar is one of the last strongholds of the critically endangered radiated and spider tortoises, known to the Malagasy as sokake. Omaha's Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium's Madagascar Biodiversity Partnership and Conservation Fusion have formed a coalition to engage the community of Lavavolo in protecting their natural heritage. The poor economic conditions of southern Madagascar leave many desperate to provide for their families. Poaching of these tortoise species for bushmeat and the illegal pet trade is rapidly driving them toward extinction. Illegal sokake hunting camps operate year-round businesses in Madagascar and Asia. These camps harvest hundreds of radiated tortoise individuals to sell on the black market. Confiscations from the camps are reported every year. This is compounded by the slashing and burning of the endemic spiny forest for agriculture and charcoal for cooking fuel. With the current rate of harvesting and habitat loss, wildlife experts predict that the tortoises will become extinct in the wild in the next 20 years.

In response, the Madagascar Biodiversity Partnership initiated the Radiated Tortoise Project in Lavavolo - with financial support from the Radiated Tortoise Species Survival Plan and the Turtle Survival Alliance. This project follows our philosophy of combining community development to ease human pressure on the ecosystem along with field research and tortoise monitoring. 

The Radiated Tortoise Project is long-term conservation that utilizes extensive fieldwork and molecular genetic data collection. Fortunately, Lavavolo's permanent residents maintain the local fady (taboo) against eating or harming the sokake. However, this fady has not been respected by outsiders that have immigrated into southern Madagascar to set up tortoise harvesting operations.

In 2008, the Madagascar Biodiversity Partnership began an intensive monitoring program of radiated tortoise nest sites at Lavavolo. During the first phase of this study, Malagasy graduate students were taught how to locate the tortoises, collect genetic samples and morphological data, while local field assistants were trained to monitor nest sites throughout the incubation period. The second phase of the project is ongoing and consists of daily nest observation and subsequent sampling of new tortoises.

Ring-Tailed Lemur Project

Utilizing methodology that was field-tested in Kianjavato, Omaha's Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium's Madagascar Biodiversity Partnership and Conservation Fusion are also initiating a number of conservation endeavors in the Lavavolo region.

Like the black and white ruffed lemurs, the equally threatened ring-tailed lemur is a prominent seed dispersing species in this arid region, eating fruit whole and passing the seeds intact. Thus, the ring-tailed lemur is a perfect candidate for a monitoring program and fecal collection efforts for a reforestation initiative in the region. To facilitate this, 10 ring-tailed lemurs from a number of populations throughout the area have been radio-collared, enabling local field assistants and students to study and monitor the lemurs and collect fecal samples.

As with the Kianjavato Education Promoting Reforestation Program (EPRP), the Lavavolo Education Promoting Reforestation Program will result in the production of seedlings that will be transplanted as part of a community-supported reforestation program that will utilize native trees to restore habitat and enable movement of lemur and tortoise populations. Once mature, endemic trees planted will entice lemurs to forage and continue the process of forest regenerations themselves, thus requiring less future human intervention. Additionally, employing local community awareness and support.

This work is coupled with intense community education and outreach efforts that integrate alternative agricultural practices, habitat restoration and species protection, resource conservation, sustainable energy technologies and entrepreneurial opportunities. Additionally, Conservation Fusion is working to build a school in this commune that historically has had little access to education.

Education and Technology Transfer

Omaha's Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium's Madagascar Biodiversity Partnership has been involved in the professional development of Malagasy graduate students and local field teams. This training and employment of local people directly involves them in conservation and encourages them to be advocates of their natural environment.

To date, more than 45 Malagasy graduate students have benefited from the program's mentoring assistance during the completion of their graduate degrees. The Madagascar Biodiversity Partnership also supports more than 75 full-time Malagasy employees as field assistants, project supervisors, office employees, drivers and supporting field personnel. In addition, at least 10 international graduate students have partnered with the program and have since successfully completed their graduate or veterinary degrees. More than two dozen international volunteers have worked with the program, gaining valuable field experience and inspiring many to pursue a graduate degree focused on conservation.

Omaha's Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium's Madagascar Biodiversity Partnership has also had an effect on Madagascar's elementary school children. The Madagascar Biodiversity Partnership's partnership with Conservation Fusion has led to numerous educational outreach activities. In 2007, for example, more than 15,000 conservation-based activity books were distributed to primary school children throughout Madagascar. Students that resided in areas of high biodiversity that was under threat from habitat destruction and hunting were specifically targeted. Following the distribution of these books, we detected a noticeable decline in the evidence of hunting. This indicates the critical role of conservation-based education and community-wide participation in preservation activities are vital for sustained preservation of natural resources and wildlife.

Our Supporters

The Madagascar Biodiversity Partnership would like to thank the following zoos, schools and organizations for their support:

 

Publications

2015

Runhua Lei, Adam T. McLain, Cynthia L. Frasier, Justin M. Taylor, Carolyn A. Bailey, Shannon E. Engberg, Azure L. Ginter, Stephen D. Nash, Richard Randriamampionona, Colin P. Groves, Russell A. Mittermeier and Edward E. Louis Jr. A New Species in the Genus Cheirogaleus (Cheirogaleidae). Primate Conservation, issue 29, 2015. http://www.primate-sg.org/storage/pdf/PC29_Lei_et_al_New_species_Cheirogaleus.pdf

2014

Lei, R., Frasier, C.L., McLain, A. T., Taylor, J.M., Bailey, C.A., Engberg, S.E., Ginter, A.L., Randriamampionona, R., Groves, C.P., Mittermeier, R.A. and Louis Jr., E.E. Revision of Madagascar's Dwarf Lemurs (Cheirogaleidae: Cheirogaleus): Designation of Species, Candidate Species Status and Geographic Boundaries Based on Molecular and Morphological Data. Primate Conservation (2014): http://www.primate-sg.org/storage/pdf/PC28_Lei_et_al_Cheirogaleus_phylogeny.pdf

Louis, E.E. and Lei, R.. Defining Species in an Advanced Technological Landscape. Evolutionary Anthropology 23, Issue 1:18-20 (2014)

Currylow, A.F.T., Ranaivoharivelo, M., and Louis, E.E.. Natural History Notes: Testudines - Turtles, Astrochelys (Radiated Tortoise). Nest Predation. Herpetological Review 45, Issue 1:116-117 (2014)

Walker, R., Rafeliarisoa, T., Currylow, A., Rakotoniaina, J.C., and Louis Jr., E.E.. Short term Monitoring reveals the rapid decline of southern Madagascar's Critically Endangered tortoise species. Herpetological Journal Vol. 24 (2014), 193-196.

Hinlo, M.R.P, Tabora, J.A.G., Bailey, C.A., Trewick, S., Rebong, G., van Weerd, M., Pomares, C.C., Engberg, S.E., Brenneman, R.A., Louis Jr., E.E.. Population Genetics Implications for the Conservation of the Philippine Crocodile Crocodylus mindorensis Schmidt, 1935 (Crocodylia: Crocodylidae). Journal of Threatened Taxa www.threatenedtaxa.org 26 March 2014 6(3): 5513-5533 [DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/JoTT.o3384.5513-33]

Schwitzer,C., Mittermeier, R. A., Johnson, S. E., Donati, G., Irwin, M., Peacock, H., Ratsimbazafy,J., Razafindramanana, J., Louis Jr., E. E,. Chikhi, L., Colquhoun, I. C., Tinsman,J., Dolch, R., LaFleur, M., Nash, S., Patel, E., Randrianambinina, B., Rasolofoharivelo,T., and Wright, P. C.. Averting Lemur Extinctions amid Madagascar’s PoliticalCrisis. Science 21 February 2014: 842-843. [DOI:10.1126/science.1245783]

Veilleux, C.C., Jacobs, R.L., Cummings, M.E., Louis, E.E., and Bolnick, D.A. (2014), Opsin Genes and Visual Ecology in a Nocturnal Folivorous Lemur. International Journal of Primatology, (Print ISSN 0164-0291 and Online ISSN 1573-8604) Volume 35, Issue 1, pp 88-107 2014-02-01 doi: 10.1007/s10764-013-9708-6

2013

Christophe Manjaribe, Cynthia L. Frasier, Bakolimalala Rakouth, and Edward E. Louis, Jr., Ecological Restoration and Reforestation of Fragmented Forests in Kianjavato, Madagascar, International Journal of Ecology, vol. 2013, Article ID 726275, 12 pages, 2013. doi:10.1155/2013/726275

Orozco-terWengel, P., Andreone, F., Louis, E. and Vences, M. (2013), Mitochondrial introgressive hybridization following a demographic expansion in the tomato frogs of Madagascar, genus Dyscophus. Molecular Ecology. doi: 10.1111/mec.12558

Castellano, C. M., Rhodin, A.G.J., Ogle, M., Mittermeier, R.A. Randriamahazo, H., Hudson, R., and Lewis, R.E., Eds. Turtles on the Brink in Madagascar: Proceedings of Two Workshops on the Status, Conservation, and Biology of Malagasy Tortoises and Freshwater Turtles. Chelonian Research Monographs (ISSN 1088-7105) No. 6 doi: 10.3854/crm.6 • © 2013 by Chelonian Research Foundation Lunenburg, MA, USA
*Published online 30 October 2013. Dr. Edward Louis Jr. was a contribution author on this paper.

Orozco-terWengel, P., Chiari, Y., Vieites, D.R., Pedrono, M., and Louis, E. E., Jr. (2013). Isolation and characterization of six polymorphic microsatellite loci for the Malagasy spider tortoise, Pyxis arachnoides and cross-amplification in Pyxis planicauda. Amphibia-Reptilia. 34: 125-128.

Perry, G.H., Louis, E.E., Jr., Ratan, A., Bedoya-Reina, O.C., Burhans, R.C., Lei, R., Johnson, S.E., Schuster, S.C., and Miller, W. (2013). Aye-aye population genomic analyses highlight an important center of endemism in norther Madagascar. Proceedings of the National Academy of Science (2013). doi: 110 (15): 5823–5828

Ranaivoarisoa, J.F., Zaonarivelo, J.R., Lei, R., Johnson, S.E., Wyman, T.M., Mittermeier, R.A., and Louis, E.E., Jr. (2013). Rapid Survey and Assessment of the Northern Sportive Lemur, Lepilemur septentrionalis, in Northern Madagascar. (2013). Primate Conservation.

Rakotoarisoa, J.-E., Bailey, C.A., Hinger, P.H., Brenneman, R.A., and Louis, E.E., Jr. (2013). Isolation and characterization of nine microsatellite loci in a Malagasy endemic rodent, Eliurus carletoni (Rodentia: Nesomyinae). Conservation Genetics Resources. 5: 203-205.

McGuire, S., Rafeliarisoa, T.H., Randriamanantenasoa, H., Randrianindrina, R.A., Shore, G.D., and Louis, E.E., Jr. (2013) Community Outreach and Education Promoting the Conservation of the Radiated Tortoise, Astrochelys radiata, in Lavavolo, Madagascar. In: Turtles on the Brink in Madagascar: Proceedings of two Workshops on the Status, Conservation, and Biology of Malagasy Tortoises and Freshwater Turtles. Castellano, C.M., Rhodin, A.G.J., Ogle, M., Mittermeier, R.A., Randriamahazo, H., Hudson, R., and Lewis, R.E. Eds. Chelonian Research Monographs.

Hauswaldt, J.S., Vences, M., Louis, E., Brennemann, R., and Ziegler, T. (2013). Genetic Screening of Captive Philippine Crocodiles (Crocodylus mindorensis) as Prerequisite for Starting a Conservation Breeding Program in Europe. Herpetological Conservation and Biology. 8(1): 75-87.

Rafeliarisoa, T.H., Walker, R.C.J., Louis, E.E., Jr. (2013). Decline in the Range and Density of Radiated Tortoises, Astrochelys radiata, in Southern Madagascar. In: Turtles on the Brink in Madagascar: Proceedings of two Workshops on the Status, Conservation, and Biology of Malagasy Tortoises and Freshwater Turtles. Castellano, C.M., Rhodin, A.G.J., Ogle, M., Mittermeier, R.A., Randriamahazo, H., Hudson, R., and Lewis, R.E. Eds. Chelonian Research Monographs.

Holmes, S.M., Baden, A.L., Brenneman, R.A., Engberg, S.E., Louis, E.E., Jr., and Johnson, S.E. (2013). Patch size and isolation influence genetic patterns in black-and-white ruffed lemur (Varecia variegata) populations. Conservation Genetics. 14: 615-624.

McGuire, S., Bailey, C., and Frasier, C. (2013). Conservation Genetics in Action: Protecting Diversity through Innovative Education Programs in Madagascar, One of the World’s Environmental Hotspots. 104(4): 591-593.

Gordon, A.D., Johnson, S.E., and Louis, E.E., Jr. (2013). Females Are the Ecological Sex: Sex-Specific Body Mass Ecogeography in Wild Sifaka Populations (Propithecus spp.). American Journal of Physical Anthropology. 151(1):77-87.

Baden, A.L., Wright, P.C., Louis, E.E., Jr., and Bradley, B.J. (2013). Communal nesting, kinship, and maternal success in a social primate. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology.

Delmore, K.E., Brenneman, R.A., Lei, R., Bailey, C.A., Brelsford, A., Louis, E.E., Jr., and Johnson, S.E. (2013). Clinal variation in a brown lemur (Eulemur spp.) hybrid zone: Combining morphological, genetic and climatic data to examine stability. Journal of Evolutionary Biology. 26 (8):1677-1690.

Schwitzer, C., Mittermeier, R.A., Davies, N., Johnson, S., Ratsimbazafy, J., Razafindramanana, J., Louis, Jr., E.E., and Rajaobelina, S. (eds). (2013). Lemurs of Madagascar: A Strategy for their Conservation 2013–2016. Bristol, UK: IUCN SSC Primate Specialist Group, Bristol Conservation and Science Foundation, and Conservation International. 185 pp.

Walker, R.C.J., Castellano, C.M., Ogle, M., Rafeliarisoa, T.H., Rakotondrainy, R., Ramahaleo, T.A., Randriamahazo, H., and Gardner, C.J. Proposed Action Plan for the Conservation of the Madagascar Spider Tortoise, Pyxis arachnoides (2013)

In: Turtles on the Brink in Madagascar: Proceedings of two Workshops on the Status, Conservation, and Biology of Malagasy Tortoises and Freshwater Turtles. Castellano, C.M., Rhodin, A.G.J., Ogle, M., Mittermeier, R.A., Randriamahazo, H., Hudson, R., and Lewis, R.E. Eds. Chelonian Research Monographs

2012

Perry GH, Reeves D, Melsted P, Ratan A, Miller W, Michelini K, Louis EE, Pritchard JK, Mason CE, & Gilad Y. (2012). "A genome sequence resource for the aye-aye (Daubentonia madagascariensis), a nocturnal lemur from Madagascar". Genome biology and evolution, 4(2), 126-135. doi: 10.1093/gbe/evr132

Florio AM, Ingram CM, Rakotondravony HA, Louis EE, Raxworthy CJ(2012). "Detecting cryptic speciation in the widespread and morphologically conservative carpet chameleon (Furcifer lateralis) of Madagascar". Journal of Evolutionary Biology. 2012 Jul;25(7):1399-414. doi: 10.1111/j.1420-9101.2012.02528.x

Paquette SR, Engberg SE, Huebinger RM, Louis EE Jr.(2012). "Characterization of 13 novel microsatellite markers in the Galápagos tortoise (Chelonoidis nigra)". Conservation Genetics Resources September 2012, Volume 4, Issue 3, pp 773-77

Rakotoarisoa JE, Bailey CA, Hinger PH, Brenneman RA, Louis EE Jr.(2012). "Isolation and characterization of nine microsatellite loci in a Malagasy endemic rodent, Eliurus carletoni (Rodentia: Nesomyinae)". Conservation Genetics Resources, September 2012, Volume 4, Issue 3, pp 773-776

Tabora JAG, Hinlo MRP, Bailey CA, Lei R, Pomares CC, Rebong G, Van Weerd M, Engberg SE, Brenneman RA, Louis EE Jr.(2012). "Detection of Crocodylus mindorensis x Crocodylus porosus (Crocodylidae) hybrids in a Philippine crocodile systematics analysis". Zootaxa 3560: 1–31

Lei R, Rowley TW, Zhu L, Bailey CA, Engberg SE, Wood ML, Christman MC, Perry GH, Louis EE Jr. and Lu G(2012). "PhyloMarker—A Tool for Mining Phylogenetic Markers Through Genome Comparison: Application of the Mouse Lemur (Genus Microcebus) Phylogeny". Evolutionary Bioinformatics 2012:8 423-435. doi: 10.4137/EBO.S9886

Ratsoavina FM, Vences M & Louis EE Jr.(2012) "Phylogeny and phylogeography of the Malagasy leaf-tailed geckos in the Uroplatus ebenaui group". African Journal of Herpetology, Volume 61, Issue 2, pages 143-158. doi:10.1080/21564574.2012.729761

Dolch R, Ratsisetraina R, Markolf M, Ratolojanahary T, Rakotonirina H, Louis E Jr., Wendenbaum E(2011/2012) "Assessment of lemur diversity in the Makay massif." Lemur News16: 48–53.

Brenneman, RA., Johnson SE, Bailey CA, Ingraldi C, Delmore KE, Wyman TM, Andriamaharoa HE, Ralainasolo FB, Ratsimbazafy JH, and Louis EE. "Population genetics and abundance of the Endangered grey-headed lemur Eulemur cinereiceps in south-east Madagascar: assessing risks for fragmented and continuous populations." Oryx 46, no. 2 (2012): 298.

Walker, R.C.J. and Rafeliarisoa,T.H. (2012). "Status of the relict population of the Critically Endangered Madagascar spider tortoise Pyxis arachnoides". Oryx, 46, pp 457463doi:10.1017/S0030605311001293

Walker, R.C.J., Whitmore, N., Rafeliarisoa, T. H., and Hamylton, S. "The effect of habitat degradation on the long term survival of the Critically Endangered Madagascar spider tortoise (Pyxis arachnoides)" Biological Conservation 152 (2012) 152–158

2011

Delmore KE, Louis EE, Jr, & Johnson SE. (2011). Morphological characterization of a brown lemur hybrid zone (Eulemur rufifrons x E. cinereiceps). American Journal of Physical Anthropology. 145:55-66.

Ratsoavina FM, Louis EE, Jr, Crottini A, Randrianiaina R-D, Glaw F, Vences M. (2011). A new leaf tailed gecko species from northern Madagascarwith a preliminary assessment of molecular and morphological variability in the Uroplatus ebenaui group. Zootaxa. 3022:39-57.

2010

Andrianaivoarivelo AR, Brenneman RA, Jenkins RKB, McGuire SM, Ramilijaona OR, Shore GD, Racey PA, & Louis EE, Jr. (2010). Genetic similarity among populations of the Madagascar rousette (Rousettus madagascariensis, Grandidier 1929, Pteropodidae) and evidence of widespread population bottleneck. Journal of Mammology. (Submitted 2010).

Brenneman R A, Johnson SE, Bailey CA, Hobinjatovo T, Ingraldi C, Delmore K, Wyman TM, Andriamaharoa HE, Ralainasolo FB, Ratsimbazafy JH, & Louis EE, Jr. (2010). Population genetics and abundance of gray-headed lemurs (Eulemur cinereiceps): Potential consequences of fragmentation and cyclones in an endangered primate. Conservation Genetics. (Submitted 2009).

Lei R, Shore GD, Brenneman RA, Engberg SE, Sitzmann BD, Bailey CA, Kimmel LM, Randriamampionona R, Ranaivoarisoa JF, & Louis EE, Jr. (2010). Complete sequence and gene organization of the mitochondrial genome of Hubbard’s sportive lemur, Lepilemur hubbardorum. GENE. 464:44-49.

McGuire SM, Emodi GP, Shore GD, Brenneman RA, & Louis EE, Jr. (2010). Characterization of 21 microsatellite marker loci in the silky sifaka (Propithecus candidus). Conservation Genetics. 10:985-988.

Mittermeier RA, Richardson M, Louis EE, Konstant WR, Langrand O, Hawkins F, Ratsimbazafy J, Rasoloarison R, Ganshorn JU, Rajaobelina S, & Schwitzer C. (2010). Lemurs of Madagascar, 3rd Edition. Conservation International Tropical Field Guide Series. Washington, D.C. USA.

Quéméré E, Chikhi L, Rabarivola C, Louis EE, Jr, & Crouau-Roy B. (2010). Landscape genetics of an endangered primate species within its whole fragmented range. Molecular Ecology. 19:1606-1621.

Quéméré E, Louis EE, Jr, Ribéron A, Chikhi L, & Crouau-Roy B.(2010). Non-invasive conservation genetics of the critically endangered golden-crowned sifaka (Propithecus tattersalli): high diversity and significant genetic differentiation over a small range. Conservation Genetics. 11:675-687.

Rafeliarisoa TH, Shore GD, McGuire SM, & Louis EE, Jr. (2010). Innovative Solutions to Conservation Challenges for the Radiated Tortoise (Astrochelys radiata) Project at Lavavolo Classified Forest, Madagascar. Turtle Survival Alliance Magazine. August 2010:64-66.

Ranaivoarisoa JF, Brenneman RA, McGuire SM, Lei R, Ravelonjanahary SS, Engberg SE, Bailey CA, Kimmel LM, Razafimananjato T, Rakotonomenjanahary R, & Louis EE, Jr. (2010). Population genetic study of the red-collared brown lemur (Eulemur collaris) in Southeastern Madagascar. Open Conservation Biology Journal. 4:1-8.

Ratsoavina FM, Gehring P-S, Ranaivoarisoa FJ, Rafeliarisoa TH, Crottini A, Louis EE, Jr., & Vences M. (2010). Molecular phylogeography of a widespread Malagasy leaf chameleon species, Brookesia superciliaris (Kuhl, 1820). Zootaxa. 2554:62-64.

Razakamaharavo V, McGuire SM, Vasey N, Louis EE, Jr, & Brenneman RA. (2010). Genetic Architecture of two red ruffed lemur (Varecia rubra) populations of Masoala National Park. Primates. 51(1):53-61.

Rioux-Paquette S, Louis EE, Jr, & Lapointe F-J. (2010). Microsatellite analyses provide the first evidence of sex-biased dispersal in tortoises (Chelonia: Testudinidae). Journal of Heredity. 101:403-412.

Zaonarivelo J, Brenneman R, Andriantompohavanana R, & Louis EE, Jr. (2010). Genetic diversity in ten Indri (Indri indri) populations and compared to other lemur species. Lemur News. 15: 59-64.

2009

Andrianaivoarivelo AR, Shore GD, McGuire SM, Jenkins RKB, Ramilijaona O, Louis EE, Jr, & Brenneman RA. (2009). Characterization of 22 microsatellite marker loci in the Madagascar rousette (Rousettus madagascariensis). Conservation Genetics. 10:1025-1028.

Bailey CA, Lei R, Brenneman RA, & Louis EE, Jr. (2009). Characterization of 21 microsatellite marker loci in the Milne-Edward’s sifaka (Propithecus edwardsi). Conservation Genetics. 10(4):1389-1392.

Day SR, Ramarokoto REAF, Sitzmann BD, Randriamboahanginjatovo R, Ramanankirija H, Randrianindrina VRA, Ravololonarivo G, & Louis EE, Jr. (2009). Re-introduction of diademed sifaka (Propithecus diadema) and black and white ruffed lemurs (Varecia variegata editorum) at Analamazaotra Special Reserve, Eastern Madagascar. Lemur News. 14:32-37.

Delmore KE, Keller MF, Louis EE, Jr, & Johnson SE. (2009). Rapid primatological surveys of the Andringitra forest corridors; direct observation of the greater bamboo lemur (Prolemur simus). Lemur News. 14:49-52.

Louis EE, Jr, Engberg SE, Randriamampionona R, Randriamanana JC, Lei R, & Brenneman RA. Phylogeography and taxonomy of the black and white ruffed lemurs (Varecia variegata) of Madagascar. American Journal of Primatology. (Submission 2009).

Mandimbihasina AR, Engberg SE, Razafimahatratra E, Tiandray H, Lewis R, Shore GD, Brenneman RA, & Louis EE, Jr. (2009). Characterization of twenty microsatellites in the Plowshare Tortoise, Astrochelys yniphora. Conservation Genetics. 10:1085-1088.

McGuire SM, Bailey CA, Rakotonirina J-N, Razanajatovo LG, Ranaivoarisoa JF, Kimmel LM, & Louis EE, Jr. (2009). Population survey of the greater bamboo lemur (Prolemur simus) at Kianjavato Classified Forest. Lemur News. 14:41-43.

McGuire SM, Sitzmann BD, Herrington K, Day SR, Ramarokoto REAF, & Louis EE, Jr. (2009). Distribution of a conservation-based activity book at two primary schools near Analamazaotra Special Reserve, Madagascar. Lemur News. 14:38-41.

Ramanamahefa R, McGuire SM, Louis EE, Jr, & Brenneman RA. (2009). Population genetic parameter estimates for six populations of crowned lemurs, Eulemur coronatus (Gray, 1842) from northern Madagascar. Lemur News.14:21-26.

Ramanamahefa R, McGuire SM, Louis EE, Jr, & Brenneman RA. (2009). Population genetic parameter estimates for five populations of Sanford’s lemur (Eulemur sanfordi) from Northern Madagascar. Lemur News. 14:26-31.

Ramanana MA, Bailey CA, Shore GD, Ramilijaona O, Brenneman RA, & Louis EE, Jr. (2009). Characterization of 20 microsatellite marker loci in the Malagasy Tree Boa (Sanzinia madagascariensis madagascariensis). Conservation Genetics. 10:1953-1956.

Ramaromilanto B, Lei R, Engberg SE, Johnson SE, Sitzmann BD, & Louis EE, Jr. (2009). Sportive lemur diversity at Mananara-Nord Biosphere Reserve, Madagascar. Texas Tech University Museum Occasional Papers. OP286:1-22.

Ramaromilanto et al. (2009) Supplemental Appendix data

Rioux-Paquette S, Lapointe F-J, & Louis EE, Jr. (2009). Conservation genetics of the Radiated tortoise (Astrochelys radiata) from Andohahela National Park, Southeast Madagascar, with a discussion on the conservation of this declining species. Chelonian Conservation and Biology. 8:84-93.

Tokiniaina H, Bailey CA, Shore GD, Delmore KE, Johnson SE, Louis EE, Jr, & Brenneman RA. (2009). Characterization of 18 microsatellite marker loci in the white-collared lemur (Eulemur cinereiceps). Conservation Genetics. 10:1459-1462.

Wright PC, Barney E, Louis EE, Jr, Dolch R, & Rafaliarison RR. (2009). Greater bamboo lemur, Prolemur simus (Gray, 1871). In: RA Mittermeier et al., Primates in Peril: The World’s 25 Most Endangered Primates 2008-2010, p. 11-14. IUCN/SSC Primate Specialist Group (PSG), International Primatological Society (IPS), and Conservation International (CI), Arlington, VA.

Vogler, BR, Bailey CA, Shore GD, McGuire SM, Engberg SE, Fickel J, Louis EE, Jr, & Brenneman RA. (2009). Characterization of 26 microsatellite marker loci in the fossa (Cryptoprocta ferox). Conservation Genetics. 10:1449-1453.

2008

Baden AL, Brenneman RA, & Louis EE, Jr. (2008). Morphometrics of wild black-and-white ruffed lemurs (Varecia variegata, Kerr 1792). American Journal of Primatology. 70:1-14.

Dolch R, Fiely JL, Ndriamiary J-N, Rafalimandimby J, Randriamampionona R, Engberg SE, & Louis EE, Jr. (2008). Confirmation of the greater bamboo lemur, Prolemur simus, north of the Torotorofotsy wetlands, eastern Madagascar. Lemur News. 13:14-17.

Dutton CJ, Junge RE, & Louis EE, Jr. (2008). Biomedical evaluation of free-ranging red ruffed lemurs (Varecia rubra) within the Masoala National Park, Madagascar. Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine. 39:76-85.

Johnson S, Lei R, Martin SK, Irwin MT, & Louis EE. (2008). Does Eulemur cinereiceps Exist? Preliminary Evidence from genetics and ground surveys in southeastern Madagascar. American Journal of Primatology. 70:372–385.

Junge RE, Dutton CJ, Knightly F, Williams CV, Rasambainarivo FT, Louis EE, Jr. (2008). Comparison of Biomedical evaluation for White-fronted Brown Lemurs (Eulemur fulvus albifrons) from four sites in Madagascar. Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine. 39:567-575.

Kremen C, Cameron A, Moilanen A, Phillips S, Thomas CD, Beentje H, Dransfeld J, Fisher BL, Glaw F, Good T, Harper G, Hijmans RJ, Lees DC, Louis EE, Jr, Nussbaum RA, Razafimpahanana A, Raxworthy C, Schatz G, Vences M, Vietes DR, Wright PC, & Zjhra ML. (2008). Aligning conservation priorities across taxa in Madagascar, a biodiversity hotspot, with high-resolution planning tools. Science. 321:340-342.

Kremen C, Cameron A, Moilanen A, Phillips S, Thomas CD, Beentje H, Dransfeld J, Fisher BL, Glaw F, Good T, Harper G, Hijmans RJ, Lees DC, Louis E, Jr, Nussbaum RA, Razafimpahanana A, Raxworthy C, Schatz G, Vences M, Vieites DR, Wright PC, & Zjhra ML. (2008). Aligning conservation priorities across taxa in Madagascar, a biodiversity hotspot, with high-resolution planning tools. Science. 320(5873):222-226.

Lei R, Day S, Ramarokoto R, Shore GD, Louis EE, Jr, & Brenneman RA. (2008). Characterization of twenty-one microsatellites developed from Propithecus deckeni deckeni with null allele affect assessment. Molecular Ecology Resources. 8:773-776.

Lei, R, Engberg, SE, Andriantompohavana R, McGuire SM, Mittermeier RA, Zaonarivelo JR, Brenneman RA, & Louis EE. (2008). Nocturnal lemur diversity at Masoala National Park. Texas Tech University Museum SpecialPublications.SP53:1-41.

Lei et al.(2008) Supplemental Appendix data

Lei R, McGuire SM, Shore GD, Louis EE, Jr, & Brenneman RA. (2008). Characterization of twenty microsatellites developed from Propithecus deckeni coronatus with cross-amplification in Propithecus deckeni deckeni. Conservation Genetics. 9:999-1002.

Louis EE, Engberg SE, McGuire SM, McCormick MJ, Randriamampionona R, Ranaivoarisoa JF, Bailey CA, Mittermeier RA, Lei R. (2008). Revision of the Mouse Lemurs, Microcebus (Primates, Lemuriformes), of Northern and Northwestern Madagascar with Descriptions of Two New Species at Montagne d'Ambre National Park and Antafondro Classified Forest. Primate Conservation. 23: 19-38.

Louis et al. (2008) Supplemental Appendix data

Mittermeier RA, Ganzhorn JU, Konstant WR, Glander K, Tattersall I, Groves CP, Rylands AB, Hapke A, Ratsimbazafy J, Mayor MI, Louis EE, Jr, Rumpler Y, Schwitzer C, & Rasoloarison RM. (2008). Lemur Diversity in Madagascar. International Journal of Primatology. 29:1607-1656.

Orozco-terWengel P, Nagy ZT,Vieites DR, Vences M, Louis E., Jr. (2008). Phylogeography and phylogenetic relationships of Malagasy tree and ground boas. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society. 95:640-652.

Ramarokoto R, Lei R, Vincent J, Day S, Shore GD, Brenneman RA, Louis E E, Jr. (2008). Characterization of twenty-one microsatellites developed from Propithecus diadema. Conservation Genetics. 9:1377-1380.

Razafindrakoto A, Quérémé E, Shore GD, McGuire SM, Louis EE, Jr, & Brenneman RA. (2008). Characterization of 20 microsatellites marker loci in the golden-crowned sifaka (Propithecus tattersalli). Conservation Genetics. 9:1027-1031.

Wright PC, Johnson SE, Irwin MT, Jacobs R, Schlichting P, Lehman S, Louis EE, Jr, Arrigo-Nelson SJ, Raharison J-L, Rafalirarison RR, Razafindratsita V, Ratsimbazafy J, Ratelolahy FJ, Dolch R, & Tan C. (2008). The Crisis of the Critically Endangered Greater Bamboo Lemur (Prolemur simus). Primate Conservation. 23:5-17.

2007

Andriantompohavana R, Lei R, Zaonarivelo JR, Engberg SE, Nalanirina G, McGuire SM, Shore GD, Andrianasolo J, Herrington K, Brenneman RA, & Louis EE, Jr. (2007). Molecular phylogeny and taxonomic revision of the woolly lemurs, Genus Avahi (Primates: Lemuriformes). Texas Tech University Museum Special Publications. SP51:1-64.

Andriantompohavana et al. (2007) Supplemental Appendix data

Andriantompohavana R, Morelli TL, Behncke SM, Engberg SE, Brenneman RA, & Louis EE, Jr. (2007). Characterization of twenty Eulemur-specific microsatellite loci characterized in two populations of the Red-Bellied Brown Lemur, Eulemur rubriventer. Molecular Ecology Notes. 7:1162-1165.

Junge RE, & Louis EE, Jr. (2007). Biomedical Evaluation of Black Lemurs (Eulemur macaco macaco) in Lokobe Reserve, Madagascar. Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine. 38:67-76.

Rioux Paquette S, Behncke S, O’Brien SH, Brenneman RA, Louis EE, Jr, & Lapointe F-J. (2007). Riverbeds demarcate distinct conservation units of the radiated tortoise (Geochelone radiata) in southern Madagascar. Conservation Genetics. 8:797-807.

Zaonarivelo JR, Andriantompohavana R, Razafindrakoto A, Andrianasolo J, Rajaobelina S, Brenneman RA, Wohlhauser S, & Louis EE, Jr. (2007). Preliminary Lemur Survey of Andavakoera Classified Forest and Regional Forest Fragments of Madagascar. Lemur News. 12:26-29.

Zaonarivelo JR, Andriantompohavana R, Shore GD, Engberg SE, McGuire SM, Louis EE, Jr, & Brenneman RA. (2007). Characterization of 21 microsatellite marker loci in the ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta). Conservation Genetics. 8(5):1209-1212.

Zaonarivelo JR, Sommer JA, McGuire SM, Engberg SE, Brenneman RA & Louis EE, Jr. (2007). Isolation and characterization of twenty microsatellite marker loci from the Indri (Indri indri) genome. Molecular Ecology Notes. 7:25-28.

2006

Andriantompohavana R, Zaonarivelo JR, Engberg SE, Randriamampionona R, McGuire SM, Shore GD, Rakotonomenjanahary R, Brenneman RA & Louis EE, Jr. (2006). The mouse lemurs of northwestern Madagascar with a description of a new species at Lokobe Special Reserve. Texas Tech University Museum Occasional Papers.OP259:1-23.

Andriantompohavana et al. (2006) Supplemental Appendix data

Andriantompohavana R, Zaonarivelo JR, Randriamampionona R, Razafindraibe JFX, Brenneman RA, & Louis EE, Jr. (2006). A preliminary study on resident lemur populations in the Mariarano Classified Forest. Lemur News. 11:21-24.

Chiari Y, Orozco-terWengel P, Vences M, Vieites DR, Sarovy A, Randrianirina JE, Meyer A, & Louis EE, Jr. (2006). Genetic identification of units of conservation in tomato frogs, genus Dyscophus. Conservation Genetics. 7(2):473-482.

Louis EE, Jr, Coles MS, Andriantompohavana R, Sommer JA, Engberg SE, Zaonarivelo JR, Mayor MI, & Brenneman RA. (2006). Revision of the Mouse Lemurs (Primates, Microcebus) of Madagascar. International Journal of Primatology. 27:347-389.

Louis et al. (2006) Supplemental Appendix data

Louis EE, Jr, Engberg SE, Lei R, Geng H, Sommer JA, Randriamampionona R, Randriamanana JC, Zaonarivelo JR, Andriantompohavana R, Randria G, Prosper, Ramaromilanto B, Rakotoarisoa G, Rooney A, & Brenneman RA. (2006). Molecular and morphological analyses of the sportive lemurs (Family Megaladapidae: Genus Lepilemur) reveals 11 previously unrecognized species. Texas Tech University Museum Special Publications.SP49:1-47.

Louis et al. (2006) Supplemental Appendix data

Mittermeier RA, Konstant WR, Hawkins F, Louis EE, Langrand O, Ratsimbazafy J, Rasoloarison R, Ganshorn JU, Rajaobelina S, Tattersall I, & Meyers DM. (2006). Lemurs of Madagascar, 2nd Edition. Conservation International Tropical Field Guide Series. Washington, D.C.USA.

Mittermeier RA, Konstant WR, Hawkins F, Louis EE, Langrand O, Ratsimbazafy J, Rasoloarison R, Ganshorn JU, Rajaobelina S, Tattersall I, & Meyers DM. (2006). Lemurs of Madagascar, Pocket Identification Guide,Nocturnal Lemurs. Conservation International Tropical Field Guide Series. Washington, D. C. USA.

Mittermeier RA, Konstant WR, Hawkins F, Louis EE, Langrand O, Ratsimbazafy J, Rasoloarison R, Ganshorn JU, Rajaobelina S, Tattersall I, & Meyers DM. (2006). Lemurs of Madagascar, Pocket Identification Guide, Diurnal and Cathemeral Lemurs. Conservation International Tropical Field Guide Series. Washington, D.C. USA.

Rafeliarisoa TH, Shore GD, Engberg SE, Louis EE, Jr, & Brenneman RA. (2006). Characterization of 11 microsatellite marker loci in the Madagascar Big-headed Turtle (Erymnochelys madagascariensis). Molecular Ecology Notes. 6:1228-1230.

Rakotoarisoa G, Shore GD, McGuire SM, Engberg SE, Louis EE, Jr, & Brenneman RA. (2006). Characterization of 13 microsatellite marker loci in the Verreaux’s Sifaka (Propithecus verreauxi). Molecular Ecology Notes. 6:1122-1125.

Rakotoarisoa G, Shore GD, McGuire SM, Engberg SE, Louis EE, Jr & Brenneman RA. (2006). Characterization of 20 microsatellite marker loci in the Coquerel’s Sifaka (Propithecus coquereli). Molecular Ecology Notes. 6:1119-1121.

Ranaivoarisoa JF, Ramanamahefa R, Louis EE, Jr, & Brenneman RA. (2006). Range extension of Perrier’s Sifaka, Propithecus perrieri, in the Andrafiamena Classified Forest. Lemur News. 11:17-21.

Razafindrakoto A, Andriantompohavana R, Wohlhauser S, Rajaobelina S, Louis EE, Jr, & Brenneman RA. (2006). Forest Fragment and Range Survey of the Ambararata-Maromokotra Loky River Locale of Northeastern Madagascar for Golden-crowned Sifaka (Propithecus tattersalli). Lemur News. 12:29-31.

Rioux-Paquette S, Behncke SM, O’Brien SH, Brenneman RA, Louis EE, Jr, & Lapointe F-J. (2006). Riverbeds demarcate distinct conservation units of the radiated tortoise (Geochelone radiata) in southern Madagascar. Conservation Genetics. 8:797-807.

Tokiniaina H, Zaonarivelo JR, Ralainasolo FB, Andriantompohavana R, Randriamanana JC, Brenneman RA, Louis EE, Jr. (2006). Rapid survey of white-collared brown lemurs (Eulemur albocollaris) in three forest fragments in southeastern Madagascar. Lemur News. 12:24-25.

Zaonarivelo JR, Andriantompohavana R, Rakotonomenjanahary R, Andrianasolo J, Brenneman RA, & Louis EE, Jr. (2006). Morphological characterization of a population of Sambirano woolly lemur (Avahiunicolor) from the Anaborano Forest in northwestern Madagascar. Lemur News. 12:21-24.

Zaonarivelo JR, Andriantompohavana R, Engberg SE, Kelley S, Randriamanana J-C, Louis EE, Jr, & Brenneman RA. (2006). Morphometric data for Indri (Indri indri) collected from 10 forest fragments in eastern Madagascar. Lemur News. 12:17-21.

Zaonarivelo JR, Andriantompohavana R, Razafindrakoto A, Andrianasolo J, Rajaobelina S, Brenneman RA, Wohlhauser S, & Louis EE, Jr. (2006). Preliminary Lemur Survey of Andavakoera Classified Forest and Regional Forest Fragments of Madagascar. Lemur News. 12:26-29.

2005

Junge RE, & Louis EE. (2005). Preliminary Biomeidcal Evaluation of Wild Ruffed Lemurs (Varecia variegata and Varecia rubra). American Journal of Primatology. 66:85-94.

Junge RE, & Louis EE, Jr. (2005). Biomedical Evaluation of Two Sympatric lemur species Propithecus verreauxi deckeni and Eulemur fulvus rufus in Tsiombokibo Classified Forest, Madagascar. Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine. 36(4):581-589.

Louis EE, Jr, Ratsimbazafy JH, Razakamaharavo VR, Pierson DJ, Barber R C, & Brenneman RA. (2005). Conservation Genetics of Black and White Ruffed Lemurs, Varecia variegata variegata, from Southeastern Madagascar. Animal Conservation. 8:105-111.

Rioux Paquette S, Shore GD, Behncke SM, Lapointe F-J, & Louis EE. (2005). Characterization of polymorphic microsatellite markers for the endangered Malagasy radiated tortoise (Geochelone radiata). Molecular Ecology. 5(3):527-530.

2004

Andriantompohavana R, Randriamanana JC, Sommer JA, Brenneman RA, & Louis EE, Jr. (2004). Characterization of twenty-two microsatellite loci developed from the genome of the Woolly Lemur (Avahi laniger). Molecular Ecology Notes. 4:400-403.

Mayor MI, Sommer JA, Houck ML, Zaonarivelo J, Wright PC, Ingram C, Engel SR, & Louis EE, Jr. (2004). Specific Status of Propithecus spp. International Journal of Primatology. 25(4):875-900.

2003

Dutton CJ, Junge RE, & Louis EE, Jr. (2003). Biomedical evaluation of free-ranging ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) in Tsimanampetsotsa Strict Nature Reserve, Madagascar. Journal of Zooand Wildlife Medicine. 34:16-24.

2002

Junge RE, & Louis EE, Jr. (2002). Medical evaluation of free-ranging Primates in Betampona Reserve, Madagascar. Lemur News. 7:23-25.

Mayor MI, Sommer JA, Huebinger RM, Barber RC, & Louis EE, Jr. (2002).Characterization of seven microsatellite marker loci in a genus of Malagasy lemurs (Propithecus). Molecular Ecology Notes. 2:385-388.

Sommer JA, Barber RC, Huebinger RM, Grassi C, Williamson JE, & Louis E E, Jr. (2002). Characterization of 14 microsatellite marker loci in the grey bamboo lemur (Hapalemur griseus). Molecular Ecology Notes. 2:161-163.

2001

Matson CW, Williamson JE, Huebinger RM, & Louis EE, Jr. (2001). Characterization of polymorphic microsatellite loci from the two endemic genera of Madagascan Boids, Acrantophis and Sanzinia. Molecular Ecology Notes. 1:41-43.

Sovey KC, Dollar L, Kerridge F, Barber RC, & Louis EE, Jr. (2001). Characterization of seven microsatellite marker loci in the Malagasy civet (Fossa fossana). Molecular Ecology Notes. 1:25-27.

Conservation Genetics Staff

E.E. Louis Jr., Ph.D., DVM
Director of Conservation Genetics Department
Madagascar Biodiversity Partnership Founder and Director General

R. Lei, Ph.D.
Conservation Geneticist, Research Associate

C.L. Frasier, Ph.D.
Conservation Geneticist, Research Associate

M.T.R. Hawkins, Ph.D.
Postdoctoral Research Assistant

S.E. Engberg, MBA, MA
Conservation Genetics Research and Administration Manager

C.A. Bailey, MS
Laboratory Technician

A.G. Barela, BS
Laboratory Technician

R.R. Culligan, BA, BA
Bioinformatics Laboratory Technician

B.A.D. Robertson, BA
Graphic Design Specialist